Eat Carbs. Dine Out. Drink Alcohol. Workout Less.

F-Factor is more than just a diet to help you lose weight and become healthier. It allows you to have a joyful, sustainable and healthy lifestyle, not a lifestyle based on deprivation and hunger, to help you become your best "you."

Watch our videos to learn more about how F-Factor can work for you.

 

Meet Tanya

Tanya Zuckerbrot, MS, RD, is a nationally-known dietitian and the creator of the renowned F-Factor Diet, the only dietitian-created program for weight-loss and optimal health that is based on fiber-rich nutrition. Tanya has worked in private practice in Manhattan for more than 15 years and her success was profiled in the Sunday Styles section of The New York Times.

The F-Factor Diet evolved from Tanya’s early work with patients to help lower cholesterol or control diabetes. She discovered that all of her patients improved their clinical conditions – and lost weight without hunger- by following a lifestyle diet that was rich in dietary fiber.

Tanya is the author of two bestselling weight loss books: The F-Factor Diet: Discover the Secret to Permanent Weight Loss (2006, G.P Putnam & Sons), and The Miracle Carb Diet: Make Calories and Fat Disappear the F-Factor Way – with Fiber! (2012, Hyperion). Read More...

 
 

In the News

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    Platt vs. Fat : Can a food critic diet successfully? 

    By  September 8, 2016 (Via Grubstreet [caption id="attachment_5484" align="aligncenter" width="600"]This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption]

    This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine

    Like the many experts I’ve consulted during the course of countless protein diets, Mediterranean diets, all-fruit diets, and assorted other doomed starvation regimes over the decades, Tanya Zuckerbrot exudes the kind of practiced optimism that skinny, type-A, successful professionals often do. There’s a small stone statue of the Buddha in her posh midtown offices, a soothing, white-toned space that feels less like a medical-consultation room than like something you’d see on the set of The View. There’s also a juddering, yellowish piece of rubber made to look like a five-pound chunk of fat, which she likes to use as a motivational tool; a doctor’s scale that is recalibrated every day; and, framed on the wall among her first-class dietitian degrees, a signed poster of the toothy, grinning televangelist Joel Osteen. Zuckerbrot, who charges corporate-lawyer fees ($15,000 for ten visits) to reveal the secrets of her popular F-Factor Method, often quotes Osteen to her prominent high-roller clients and has seen him in person at least three times, which, as she puts it, “is a lot of times to see Joel Osteen for a nice Jewish girl like me.”
    During our first visit together, Zuckerbrot gives me cheerful tips on how to avoid the temptations of the several Peking-duck dinners it’s my professional duty to devour that week (“Forget those pancakes, Adam, and just taste the skin!”), and how to behave at the cocktail function I’m about to attend (“Anything on a skewer is your best friend, Adam!”). She’s studied my first-ever “F-Factor Journal,” a slightly comical document that includes carefully recorded visits to Sparks Steak House to gorge on slabs of sirloin. She’s weighed me (a hefty 273 pounds), measured my body fat (a totally obese 31.3 percent), and assured me that although I am technically diabetic and a few pounds short of morbidly obese, this isn’t such a tragic state of affairs, because roughly two-thirds of the entire country is overweight or obese these days, Adam. But most important of all, I’m here today in her office, and if I follow the steps of her F-Factor diet, everything will work out. Except that in the realm of mega-super-diets, as in the realm of ecstatic religious conversions, and indeed almost anything you can name in that great tragicomedy called life, both Zuckerbrot and I know better than anyone that things don’t always work out in the end. Which is possibly why, when I show up for my second session the following week, with another slightly comical food diary, penned in my tiny, earnest, indecipherable big man’s handwriting, Zuckerbrot — who is dressed, as usual, in designer clothes and a pair of red-soled Christian Louboutins — looks for the briefest second like she’s just seen a giant, overfed ghost. “I’ve been thinking about you, Adam,” she says, grinning a slightly pained grin. “I was worried that you’d never come back again!” Who could blame her for being nervous? As anyone who’s even remotely familiar with the grim statistics on long-term weight loss knows, diets are made to be broken, especially by mountain-size professional gourmands whose job it is to consume anywhere from 3,000 to 10,000 calories during a normal working day. As Zuckerbrot will tell me, she also has a reputation to think of (“I’ll be honest, Adam, I don’t like failure, and given your profession, I’ve had my concerns”). Plus, unlike the assorted gilded uptown housewives, corpulent Wall Street CEOs, calorie-conscious anchors, and aspiring supermodels (among many other things, Zuckerbrot is the “Official Nutritionist to the Miss Universe Organization”) who make up her devoted F-Factor flock, I won’t be forking over real money for her special, fiber-rich diet plan, which includes 24/7 availability, the highlight of which is a number to text for counsel during moments of existential panic while loitering guiltily in the Shake Shack line, say, or scanning the menu before ordering your omakase dinner at Nobu. Because — also unlike the rest of her clients — it was my crackpot idea to attempt to lose weight while routinely visiting the city’s finest restaurants. During her most optimistic moments, Zuckerbrot assures me that this is actually not such a crazy idea. As the ultimate F-Factor guinea pig, I could drink alcohol on her diet (although not too much, and no sugar mixed with your spirits, please), and I wouldn’t be punishing myself with brutal cardio workouts, which stimulate the appetite. Proteins are great, but not the overly fatty kind. And because I would be taking my carbohydrates not in the normal pasta-and-bread-basket form but from an endless stream of distressingly tasteless Scandinavian bran crackers, I would feel full without tipping too far into a zombified state. I would, in the process, learn to taste my restaurant dinners instead of ingesting them, the way I was used to, like a great blue whale sucks up clouds of tiny shrimp in the deep-blue sea. Like most portly food lovers, I’d attempted to control my appetite in a hundred different ways over the years. I’d experimented with trendy juice cleanses, buzzy taurine-spiked protein powders, and two-day-a-week fasting regimes. About a decade ago, I’d dutifully lost 50 pounds under the care of another nutritionist, before gaining all the weight back during the course of a delirious, yearlong fatso binge. I’d even visited my share of what A. J. Liebling, the patron saint of all giant, blue-whale food writers, contemptuously referred to as slimming prisons, where I’d huffed up and down arid desert hillsides before returning to the life of leisurely, booze-filled luncheons and furtive midnight ice cream. But Liebling famously ate himself into the grave at age 59, and as I entered those same choppy late-middle-age waters, with two small daughters and an increasingly skinny, perplexed wife, it was time to take one last, gasping lunge at the golden ring of good health. After my latest checkup, our long-suffering family doctor, whom I’ll call Dr. P, had called with a note of alarm in his voice, sounding, it later occurred to me, like the engineer of some listing, recently stricken ocean liner, making a last, desperate call to the bridge. Dr. P and I had had our little emergencies before, of course. There was the kidney stone I’d misdiagnosed as a bad case of indigestion after a particularly fierce Sichuan dinner, and the time I returned from a Champagne-fueled junket to El Bulli with a flaming case of gout. But this was a different kind of emergency. My numbers were spiking. He was prescribing cholesterol-lowering statins for the first time, and horse-size pills to control my suddenly diabetic blood-sugar levels, and he suggested I consider making a change, after years of unchecked grazing, in what he diplomatically called my “professional eating habits.” For a month or two, I’d tried changing my professional eating habits on my own, and even asked a few of my bemused colleagues for their on-the-job diet tips. Alan Richman, who’s managed to remain remarkably trim during the course of his long, award-winning dining career, wished me luck on my quest, and joked that the key to his good health was avoiding bread baskets and taking the stairs whenever possible, including walking several times a day up and down the staircase of his large suburban home. Mimi Sheraton said she’d added 70 pounds to her small frame while gorging herself as the chief Times restaurant critic during the ’70s and ’80s. It took her five years of light eating as a regular civilian to take the weight off, but my dining schedule was less punishing than hers, so who knows — maybe a miracle would occur. “Don’t let this job kill ya,” Mimi said one evening, as she watched me forking the food from everyone’s plates during one of my working dinners. ”It’s not worth it!” [caption id="attachment_5483" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption] On the first day of my great diet adventure, I whir up a breakfast smoothie made of swampy-colored hemp protein powder, frozen blueberries, and almond milk. It looks (and tastes) like frozen plasterboard. Lunch is two lox sandwiches made with a scrim of yogurt and four compressed, F-Factor-approved wheat-bran crackers from Norway, which taste like dried lawn-mower clippings and have the texture of flattened Brillo pads. After another cracker snack, dinner is a visit to not one but two steakhouses in search of the city’s finest cut of New York strip, which I taste in tiny little bites while primly pushing the boats of creamed spinach and ruinous potato dishes aside. I repeat my smoothie-and-cracker routine the next day, and the day after that, and after another modest Peking-duck dinner of mostly scallions, hoisin sauce, and delectably crispy skin, and a visit to a trendy vegetarian restaurant, I take the night off and sit in front of the television in a dazed, semi-starved state, watching reruns of Naked and Afraid. Not that this is so unpleasant. Like the bewildered contestants on that greatest of all reality-TV diet shows, I can feel my stomach contracting, even after just a few days of roaming around on this new calorie-deprived savanna. “I’m beginning to notice a change in your eating habits,” Mrs. Platt says suspiciously when she comes home to find me sitting at the kitchen table eating my salad and crackers, instead of standing over the sink devouring last night’s congealed restaurant leftovers, along with the remnants of the girls’ macaroni-and-cheese dinner, like I sometimes do. Nine days after my first visit, I return again to the F-Factor offices, where Zuckerbrot greets me nervously. We discuss the concept of thermogenesis, which is the process behind her fiber-rich philosophy (whereby the body burns calories in its attempt to digest fiber), and her distaste for the way most people use the word diet (it means “a pattern of eating,” not a temporary weight-loss program). Like lots of neurotic pudgy people, I have an aversion to being weighed, so when I lumber onto her scale, I hum to myself and look up at the ceiling. She adjusts the weights, and as I keep humming to myself, she falls quiet for a time. “Would you believe it, Adam?” she finally says, in a shaky way, like someone having an ecstatic experience at a Joel Osteen event. “You’ve lost 14 pounds.” According to a gadget called the Omron Body Fat Analyzer, I’ve shed ten pounds of fat in a little over a week, plus some additional water weight. Extreme weight loss isn’t uncommon at the beginning of diets, and given my size, this isn’t a huge amount in percentage terms. Still, this is exciting. The complex fiber has balanced my sugar levels while making me feel full, and deprived of the usual all-you-can-eat buffet of refined carbohydrates, my body has been burning fat. “There’s a thin guy buried inside of you, Adam,” she says, using the simple metaphors of the practiced evangelist. “We are pouring the cement down now. Once we build a good foundation, we will build a healthy house.” To celebrate, Zuckerbrot introduces a new cracker into my dining routine, one sweetened pleasantly with raisins and traces of honey. She explains that the F-Factor diet didn’t begin as a slimming diet, in the usual sense of the word. She’d found her secret-weapon crackers, called “GG Bran Crispbreads,” on the dusty bottom shelf of the health store across from her apartment while looking for ways to lower cholesterol and manage blood-sugar levels for cardiovascular and type-2-diabetes patients she was working with after graduating with her master’s in nutrition and food studies from NYU. After three months of ingesting industrial amounts of fiber, her diabetes patients found that in addition to lowering their blood sugar, they’d lost considerable weight. Soon, non-diabetics were clamoring for diet tips, and when celebrities began signing on (Megyn Kelly, Katie Couric), her career took off. I enjoy my new honey-flavored crackers that evening, before visiting a poultry-themed French bistro called Le Coq Rico, where my dining party and I order two whole chickens, a fat slab of foie gras encased in pastry, and a whole roasted guinea fowl. “What’s the matter, are you ill?” asks one of my guests as I take a bite of each of these delicacies and spend the rest of dinner moving their remains around my plate. On the contrary, I’ve never felt better, which is how new dieters, like new members of any sect, tend to feel during the first, heady days of conversion. I experience bizarre surges of energy, and instead of slouching off to the coffee bar for a post-lunch pick-me-up, I begin taking jaunty afternoon power walks. Food writers tend to fall into two broad categories: those who describe the experience of the meal (Liebling, Calvin Trillin) and those who obsessively chronicle the actual tastes that appear on the plate (Craig Claiborne, Richard Olney). I’ve always considered myself a bumbling, very junior member of the former group, but as I drop three pounds the next session and four more two weeks after that, I begin regaling my startled fresser colleagues with flowery descriptions of the sugary snap of fresh garden carrots. “Now, this is what’s called ‘depth of flavor,’ ” I hear myself proclaim one evening at the fine new Village bistro Mimi. The subject of my enthusiasm, I dimly recall, is a helping of plump, hand-rolled gnocchi, which a couple of short weeks ago I would have hoovered up without comment. But after being relentlessly carpet-bombed with Nordic bran, my taste buds react like they’re experiencing the buttery softness of this Italian dumpling for the first time, a sensation which is repeated as we move from the gnocchi, to the pot of coarsely mashed, properly fatty pork rillettes (“Can you taste those porky barnyard notes?”) on to rhubarb-flavored soufflé (“As light as a balloon!”) for dessert. It doesn’t take long, after years of public grumpiness, for this bizarrely optimistic new tone to creep into my work. “You’re getting soft, Platty,” my editor says as he reads the draft of yet another three-star write-up (three stars out of five being “generally ecstatic” on the tortured Platt scale). Often I’ll go long months without writing a three-star review, especially in this era of clamorous little bar-restaurants and overhyped comfort foods. But I’ve written three during the early stages of my dieting binge, extolling the virtues of everything from pork sandwiches to wood-fired pizza pies. Sure, I’ve turned out the usual jaded critic’s observations in between these love letters, but maybe it’s true, as Zuckerbrot has prophesied, that my new, more measured eating habits will rekindle my love affair with food. But as any nutritionist or serial dieter will tell you, if losing weight is relatively easy, your chances of keeping your appetite in check over time are roughly the same as your summiting the ten highest peaks on the planet without the benefit of oxygen. By an optimistic measure, four out of five people fail to maintain weight loss after a year. Besides, if by some miracle you do manage to shed those extra 50 pounds, it takes years for the complex metabolic triggers that control the appetite to adjust to your new, lighter weight — and some experts think that this never happens. Until that time, the body’s keen metabolic sensors are in protective starvation mode, sending pulsating siren calls throughout your svelte new form via the dimly understood parts of the brain that control that complex jumble of cues we call “appetite.” Which is probably why, weeks into my diet — after conveniently forgetting to record anything in my food diary, consuming an entire 20-course tasting dinner at Blue Hill at Stone Barns (“That’s not on the Daddy Diet,” my horrified daughter says, watching Daddy cram chunks of delicious, fresh-baked chocolate-and-cherry bread down his giant maw), and enjoying a furtive late-night snack of leftover Bonchon fried-chicken wings — the Omron Body Fat Analyzer records that I’ve gained back two pounds of fat. This news happens to coincide with the release of a dispiriting, and widely reported study by researchers a the National Institute of Health who spent years following doomed members of NBC’s Biggest Loser as they relentlessly gained back the hundreds of pounds they’d lost on the show. Predictably, Tanya doesn’t have much time for the Biggest Loser phenomenon (“You can’t expect those poor people to exercise like lunatics for eight hours a day when they get home, Adam!”). We discuss the difference between “hunger,” which is a physiological state (your stomach grumbles, you feel irritable and light-headed, etc.), and “appetite,” which is a murky, psychological one, susceptible to all kinds of imaginary and inherited cues, especially in the funhouse world of restaurants where things like plate size (larger ones make you eat more) and menu descriptions (“succulent,” “fresh baked”) are all carefully manipulated to seduce diners into downing calories like hogs at a trough. “If you don’t want to become another statistic, you can’t eat your restaurant dinners like a normal fat American,” Zuckerbrot says, furrowing her carefully penciled brow in a gently disapproving way. “Mindful indulgence” is this week’s mantra, and for good measure she relates motivational stories about fleshy business-mogul clients who fork over thousands of dollars for her nutritional secrets but in the end never lose a single pound. “Character flows through people like a river,” she says, fixing me with one of her mesmerizing stares. “You know what they say, Adam: If you cheat on your taxes, you’ll cheat in life.” I try not to cheat that week, or the week after, but lumbering slowly around town on my gastronomic rounds, furtively ingesting fiber-cracker snacks in the backs of taxicabs, the magic goal of 20 percent body fat seems like an increasingly distant, Sisyphean task. But as the visits tick by, the Omron Body Fat numbers begin slowly to creep downward, from 28.3 percent (“Anything more than three bites is not mindful indulgence for a man like you!”) to 26.4 percent (“We’re counting carbs, not calories, Adam. Remember, there’s 40 grams of carbs in that cup of quinoa, so when you order one of those bowls, it’s like eating three slices of Wonder Bread!”) to a promising but still very obese 26 percent. The week before my last official visit to the F-Factor offices, I attend two weddings. I write another glowing, three-star review, this time of a new Chinese restaurant in the Village where, among other things, I enjoy two kinds of cold Sichuan-style chicken, several excellent varieties of regional noodle specialties, and an ethereal bowl of rice and tomato soup crowned with strands of fresh watercress. Zuckerbrot has recently gotten engaged, so strips of celebratory pink and white paper bunting are strung up around the white-toned office. When I clamber on the scale, I weigh in at 235 pounds, which is approximately 40 pounds less than when I’d begun my diet experiment. And despite those wedding indulgences, my body fat is also down again, although only by a meager tenth of one percent. Despite the festive decorations, Zuckerbrot’s not in much of a celebratory mood, although, for some reason, I am. When I tell her it’s time to take the training wheels off and chart my own, wobbly dietary course, at least for a while, she regales me with more horror stories about clients who’ve lost over 100 pounds, failed to follow the F-Factor maintenance program (which carries a price tag of $6,000), and returned a year later fatter than ever. She reminds me that I’m still technically obese (“You have 15 pounds to go, Adam; you can’t enjoy yourself yet!”) and that I’ll need “wiggle room” to gain a few pounds, given my hazardous occupation. She cautions me against feeling pleased with myself, because when fat people feel self-satisfied, they tend to reward themselves with buckets of fried chicken. I assure her that those days are over. It’s my plan to lose even more weight over the next couple of weeks, in preparation for my triumphant checkup with Dr. P. I dutifully ingest my crackers that afternoon, and later that evening, at a new French restaurant downtown, I order a congratulatory martini, followed by the relatively slimming fillet of sole, which I enjoy along with a few chaste little tastes of crackly skinned duck breast and several fatty bites of a delicious $43 lamb chop. There are also a few sips of Vouvray (’09 Le Clos de la Meslerie, for the record), followed by a grand flotilla of French desserts — crystal saucers filled with apricots and sorbet, a classic opera cake flecked with gold leaf on top. I take a bite of the little cake, then put down my spoon for a while, but when coffee comes, I take another bite, and then another, and before I know it, the dessert is gone. *A version of this article appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Download a PDF of the original article here.
    " ["post_title"]=> string(56) "New York Magazine Food Critic Loses Weight with F-Factor" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "new-york-magazine-food-critic-loses-weight-f-factor" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 17:36:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 17:36:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5477" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1084 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5349) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:28:33" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:28:33" ["post_content"]=> string(14576) "By David Zinczenko July 20, 2016 (Via EAT THIS NOT THAT

    “I don’t like to get political,” said my friend Jessica a few months back. “But I’d totally vote for Megyn Kelly.”

    megyn-kelly-diet-main The Fox News anchor was making headlines that week for “clearing the air” with Donald Trump, landing an interview after they scuffled at a Republican Primary debate. A few months before, she appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair. And of course she’s been in the headlines this week, joining the lineup of other women who have said they were sexually harassed by their boss, head of Fox News. Meanwhile, she remains one of the channel’s brightest stars—and a powerhouse on social media, with 2+ million followers. Like my friend Jessica, we here at Eat This, Not That! don’t like to get political, but we recognize a powerhouse when we see one—and we know Megyn Kelly is powered by food. In fact, Tanya Zuckerbrot, RD, the author of Kelly's favorite diet book, F-Factor, has been a regular contributor to eatthis.com, so we couldn’t help but ask her to share her best weight loss tips and how to eat your way to a successful life, as a successful woman. Republican, Democrat, Vegetarian, Flexitarian—anyone can appreciate this essential list of the top tips for success on the F-Factor Diet, written exclusively for Eat This, Not That! by Zuckerbrot herself. And to lose even more weight, with proven advice from celebrity nutritionists and trainers, don't miss this essential list of 50 Best-Ever Weight-Loss Secrets From Skinny People!

    EAT CARBS TO LOSE WEIGHT 

    ...BUT THE RIGHT ONES 

    megyn-kelly-diet-berriesSo often dieters cut out carbohydrates in an attempt to lose weight. But carbs fuel our bodies and cutting them out leads to you feeling tired, cranky and weak. This can trigger excess snacking and feeling deprived which is not consistent with weight loss. And yet while eating carbohydrates is essential to functioning, eating them in excess does lead to weight gain. The goal is to eat just the right amount of the right carbs. Some of my favorites include bran, low-sugar fiber cereals, apples, pears, artichokes, berries and broccoli.

    NOT JUST ANY CARBS

    EAT FIBER

    The F-Factor Diet is a high fiber foods program, and eating fiber is essential to success. It allows you to eat the carbohydrates necessary for energy without gaining weight. I love fiber because it’s the zero-calorie, non-digestible part of a carbohydrate that adds bulk to food. When eaten, fiber swells in the stomach. Therefore, when you follow a diet rich in fiber (like F-Factor) you feel full after eating and you’ll generally eat less throughout the day, leading to weight loss. Not to mention, fiber absorbs and removes fat and calories, and boosts metabolism! 

    EAT BREAKFASTmegyn-kelly-diet-breakfast

    EVEN IF YOU DON’T WANT TO

    Skipping breakfast slows down metabolism and leads to weight gain. Breakfast jump-starts your metabolism for the day, making it extremely important to consume. Studies show that breakfast eaters burn calories more efficiently throughout the day and are more likely to be thinner than non-breakfast eaters. In fact, sumo wrestlers in Japan aren't fed breakfast, so that they gain weight! Eating breakfast is key to success on the F-Factor Diet because it is an opportunity to meet up to half your daily fiber needs before noon. Examples I enjoy: high fiber cereal or overnight oats with lean protein such as egg whites, Greek yogurt, or low-fat cheeses are the ultimate combination because these nutrients will fill you up on the fewest calories and keep blood sugar stable all morning.

    ENJOY FIBER AND PROTEIN AT EVERY MEAL

    ...MAKING LOSING WEIGHT NO BIG DEAL

    Clinical evidence shows that fiber and protein have a high satiety benefit in calorie-controlled diets and in weight reduction. The combination keeps you feeling full, for the longest period of time, on the fewest calories. The fuller you feel after a meal, the less likely you’ll be to overeat at the next meal; and, therefore, the more likely you’ll be to lose weight. Eating small meals throughout the day also keeps metabolism burning efficiently and prevents excessive hunger (which can lead to clouded judgment when selecting foods and overeating at the next meal). Many people believe that by skipping meals, they will save on calories, and lose more weight. However, skipping meals may inhibit weight loss and even lead to weight gain over time. Here’s why: When your body is deprived of food for many hours between meals, it starts conserving fuel and burning fewer calories to protect itself from starving. Your metabolism slows down, therefore inhibiting weight loss despite reduced caloric intake. In addition, skipping meals causes sugar levels to begin to drop. Low blood sugar can produce sudden hunger pangs, which can trigger bingeing and food cravings. Blood sugar levels begin to drop within two hours of eating, which is why successful F-Factor Dieters aim to eat 4 small meals a day: breakfast (no later than an hour after rising), lunch, snack and dinner at 4-5 hour intervals.(Related: The 36 Top Peanut Butters—Ranked.)

    CHANGE YOUR LIFE

    WITHOUT CHANGING YOUR LIFESTYLE

    Temporary solutions tend to equal temporary results; permanent changes can lead to permanent weight loss, and to keep changes permanent a dieter needs a plan that allows them to live their life. The most successful long term F-Factor dieters are the ones who continue their lives, eating at their favorite restaurants, socializing with friends and drinking healthy alcoholic drinks. The more restricted a person is, the more likely they are to drop a lifestyle change. Positive habits come from enjoying the activities you love and a meal plan that is appropriate to them. Drinking and dieting can go hand in hand. When people cut out alcohol they can lose weight; however, once they start drinking again, they gain it back. On the F-Factor Diet drinking alcohol is allowed from Day 1. On F-Factor, you have the freedom to dine out anywhere, or cook for yourself if you want. You have the freedom to drink alcohol and more free time too since life with F-Factor doesn’t require you to spend hours at the gym.

    DITCH THE TREADMILL

    AND PICK UP THE WEIGHTS (IF YOU BOTHER WITH THE GYM AT ALL)

    Diet trumps exercise when it comes to weight loss. However, strength training is an excellent choice to complement a healthful diet like F-Factor. There are benefits to strength training over cardiovascular activity for weight loss: It takes a long time to burn foods with cardiovascular activities. Eating one slice of pizza (~350 calories) would take 59 minutes of walking (at an average of 3.5 calories per minute) to burn off. Cardio (in running, elliptical, walking) also stimulates appetite and leaves people feeling hungry, so they end up eating more than if they hadn’t worked out. Additionally, often in rapid weight loss, people lose muscle mass as well as fat mass. Maintenance of lean muscle mass is very important in weight loss, mainly because muscle burns more than fat. In fact, women lose half a pound of muscle every year starting from age 30 regardless of if they are losing weight! An important goal for women in exercise should be to preserve muscle mass. Strength/resistance training is more effective than cardiovascular activity in preservation of precious muscle mass. A study done by the Journal of Applied Physiology showed that resistance training significantly increased lean body mass in participants, while cardiovascular exercise significantly decreased it. (Related: 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter!_

    DRINK MORE WATER

    KEEPING A WATER BOTTLE BY YOUR SIDE

    Drinking water is especially important on the F-Factor Diet because of the high amount of fiber F-Factor Dieters consume. When fiber combines with water, it forms a soft gel, which leads to firm stools and allows for easy defecation. On the other hand, if you eat a lot of fiber and don’t compensate by drinking more water, it can lead to the opposite effect—constipation. (Enjoy a cup of green tea, too.) Being dehydrated can also mimic hunger. Many times, our hunger is really just thirst in disguise and you can experience symptoms such as feeling weak, cranky and tired. To get rid of these symptoms we then grab a candy bar when all we really needed was a drink of zero-calorie water. And finally, water plays a key role in nearly every bodily function and it fills you up so you tend to eat less!

    CATCH THOSE ZZZS

    7.5 HOURS WORTH, AT LEAST

    The amount and quality of your sleep affects the hormones (leptin and ghrelin) that control feelings of hunger and fullness, thus impacting weight loss efforts. Ghrelin, which is produced in the GI tract, stimulates appetite, causing you to feel hungry. Leptin, which is produced in the fat cells, is responsible for sending a signal to your brain that you are full. When you’re well rested these hormones work in balance; however, when you are sleep deprived, leptin levels plummet and ghrelin levels rise, setting the stage for overeating or one to many cheat meals. Low leptin levels mean your brain doesn’t get the message you are full/ you don’t feel satisfied after you eat. Elevated ghrelin levels mean stimulated appetite. A University of Chicago 2004 study found that when sleep was restricted to 4 hrs per night over 2 nights, leptin dropped by 18%, while ghrelin increased by an average of 28%. After sleeping poorly subjects were more inclined to eat sugary, refined carbs. Sleep deprivation also leads to exaggerated feelings of hunger during day, even if we’ve had enough to eat. Aim for 7.5 hours of sleep for a good night’s sleep and help prevent you from overeating the next day. 

    SLOW DOWN, SPEED RACER

    TRY CHOPSTICKS!

    Eating slower helps you to eat less food, because it gives your brain the time needed to register that you are full. A study by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics confirmed that eating slower resulted in fewer calories consumed and higher satiety at meal completion. Using chopsticks or your non-dominant hand to eat are tricks to more eating and slowing down. Eating with chopsticks leads to smaller amounts of food in each mouthful (vs a fork). If you aren’t a natural or advanced chopstick user, this may also mean taking time to put foods on the chopstick and to think mindfully about how to eat, and thus boost your metabolism. Heavy, calorically dense sauces also will slide off of the chopstick vs. when people eat with a spoon.

     

    " ["post_title"]=> string(54) "Eat This Not That: 9 Ways Megyn Kelly Stays Slim at 45" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(40) "eat-not-9-ways-megyn-kelly-stays-slim-45" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5349" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#1098 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5270) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 14:58:40" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 14:58:40" ["post_content"]=> string(1978) "

    (Jae-Ha Kim is a New York Times bestselling author and travel writer. You can respond to this column by visiting her website at www.jaehakim.com. You may also follow "Go Away With..." on Twitter at @GoAwayWithJae where Jae-Ha Kim welcomes your questions and comments.) (c) 2016 JAE-HA KIM DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
    This article was also published online by the LA Times (6/28/16), Chicago Tribune (6/28/2016) and others. " ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Chicago Tribune: Go Away With... Tanya Zuckerbrot" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "tribune-go-away-tanya-zuckerbrot" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 15:24:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 15:24:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5270" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#1093 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5252) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-07-12 16:20:55" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-12 16:20:55" ["post_content"]=> string(4866) "

    5 Tricks for Eating Healthy--but Not Depriving Yourself--On Vacation

     July 9, 2016 (Via VOUGE) [caption id="attachment_5254" align="aligncenter" width="600"]healthy-vacation-eating Photographed by Patrick Demarchelier, Vogue, April 2013[/caption] Possibly the best part of vacation is experiencing the most delicious meals your destination has to offer—wontons in Hong Kong, creamy gouda in Amsterdam, and a scoop (or two) of stracciatella gelato in Portofino. But a solid week of gluttony can leave even the most ambitious sightseer feeling sluggish. Is it possible to indulge in your epicurean cravings yet manage to stay light and energized? New York City Nutritionist Tanya Zuckerbrot M.S. R.D. says yes. Here, her top tips for keeping eating habits in balance on holiday. Vacation begins at the airport. Kick-start your trip by packing a healthy, filling meal or snack for the plane ride (airplane food tends to be neither good for you nor good). Zuckerbrot’s favorite mix includes fresh produce, protein, and fiber, such as hummus and veggies, low-fat cheese, and a handful of almonds. If, however, you’re the type who tends to end up rushing to the airport at the last minute, it’s also possible to find healthy options before boarding. Zuckerbrot suggests grabbing Greek yogurt and piece of fruit, or a protein-packed open-faced sandwich made with turkey and whole wheat bread. Worst-case scenario? “Restaurants always have salad,” she says, “Order some plain grilled chicken and dressing on the side.” Perhaps the most important in-flight health tip, though, is to “drink tons of water,” she says, since the air at 30,000 feet is dehydrating. Buy the biggest bottle you can find to fight jet lag and grogginess on landing. Avoid the mini-bar. Skip the sugar- and salt-laden hotel snacks, and wander over to a local farmers’ market to pick out your own; it’s also a fun way to get to know your new surroundings. With your room stocked with fresh, in-season fruit and flavorful treats, you’ll feel satiated and also lighter between outings. Don’t skip breakfast. “Begin every day with a major breakfast,” says Zuckerbrot—and don’t hold back on fruit. Most hotels offer great brunches, so why not take advantage of the spread? Skip the sweet pastries and bacon, however, and “opt for a filling egg-white omelet, whole-wheat toast, and antioxidant-rich berries,” she suggests. Best of all, the most important meal of the day will fuel your body for a jam-packed day of seeing the sights. Tailor your meals to your destination. Before your trip, do a little research and seek out the best dishes in each country you plan to visit. Heading to Paris? Allow yourself the pleasure of a fresh-baked baguette. Skip the bread in Tokyo (but definitely enjoy the sushi), order pasta in Capri (Italian portions are smaller anyway), and get a beignet to share in New Orleans. “Traveling is an experience,” Zuckerbrot says, “and you don’t want to miss out.” But order your splurge at lunch, she notes, “especially if you have an active afternoon ahead.” At dinner, switch to a light meal of lean protein and veggies that won’t fill you up too much before bed (bonus: You’ll sleep better). Indulge strategically. You’re on vacation—go ahead and eat dessert. Just remember to savor it slowly and that portion size counts. And don’t forget about the hidden calories in alcohol, Zuckerbrot points out: “Stay away from beverages that are made with juice and stick to simple cocktails,” like a simple spirit on the rocks or a glass of wine." ["post_title"]=> string(64) "Vogue: How to Eat Healthy on Vacation - The Best Tips and Tricks" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(24) "vogue-vacation-diet-tips" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 20:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 20:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5252" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#1094 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4975) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-05-10 17:21:00" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-05-10 17:21:00" ["post_content"]=> string(628) "

    Celebrity Food Trends

    Live like a star.  Celebrities always look fit and fabulous because of the great foods they eat. Nutritionist to the stars, Tanya Zuckerbrot shares the hottest celebrity food trends on The Wendy Williams Show (5/10/16) for Wendy's Live Like A Star Week! " ["post_title"]=> string(53) "Tanya Zuckerbrot on The Wendy Williams Show (5/10/16)" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(21) "celebrity-food-trends" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-07-28 18:38:57" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-28 18:38:57" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=4975" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#1095 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(4633) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-02-28 22:24:11" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-02-28 22:24:11" ["post_content"]=> string(9319) "

    [playlist type="video" tracklist="false" ids="4936"]

    Megyn Kelly uses the high-fiber F-Factor Diet to stay ‘lightweight’

    BY NICOLE LYN PESCE | Friday, January 29, 2016, 1:03 PM | NY Daily News

    Donald Trump called Megyn Kelly a “lightweight” reporter - but the Fox News anchor actually stays light in weight thanks to a $15,000 high-fiber meal plan.

    Kelly credited the F-Factor Diet patented by Manhattan dietitian Tanya Zuckerbrot for staying in fighting shape to face off against Trump and moderate the Republican Presidential debates.

    “I would recommend ‘The F-Factor Diet’ because that is a great book and a great way of eating,” she told her “The Kelly File” guest Michael Moore on Tuesday.Megyn2

    “I just like [Zuckerbrot] and it works,” Kelly added, before offering to send the portly director home with some of the diet’s recommended fiber crackers.

    The surprise endorsement shot Zuckerbrot’s 2007 book “The F-Factor Diet” to the top of Amazon’s Movers & Shakers list, and the nine-year-old slim-down guide sold out overnight.

    “My publisher is frantically reprinting copies,” marvels Zuckerbrot, whose fiber and protein-rich meal plan that still allows for boozing up and dining out has attracted high-profile clients such as Kelly and Katie Couric.

    Bad weather? Why don't you play Novomatic Lucky Lady's Charm Slot with no deposit, and see how you luck works. Thank you!

    While Zuckerbrot personally charges a hefty $15,000 pricetag for 10 sessions, which include a one-hour consultation, a two-hour educational workshop to go over the nutrition involved, and eight follow-up appointments, she has three associates in her Midtown office who offer similar F-Factor packages for a more palatable $4,500.

    Or shoppers can snap up "The F-Factor Diet" book, which was back in stock on Amazon as of Friday, for under $13.50.

    “I recognize this is expensive, but this is not a short-term diet solution,” explains Zuckerbrot, who says clients lose eight to 10 pounds their first month on the F-Factor Diet, and another 10 to 15 pounds on average after that. “Our patients recognize they are paying for a long-term solution that will last the rest of their lives.”

    So what is the mysterious “F-Factor” that makes Kelly and Couric camera-ready?

    The plan focuses on adding more fiber and protein to each meal and snack, rather than cutting out the usual suspects such as carbs, sugar and alcohol.

    The nutrient-dense fiber, such as Finn Crisp or GG Bran Crispbreads crackers, spinach and apples, not only leaves subjects feeling fuller longer, but also boosts metabolism and slows digestion since the body burns calories by working to break down fiber, which it can’t digest.

    And piling more fiber and protein on the plate crowds out the sugary carbs that pack on extra pounds.

    “We say, ‘Combining fiber and protein with every meal makes losing weight no big deal,” says Zuckerbrot. “We make sure to give our clients tons of variety, and to make sure that they never feel hungry.”

    So Kelly rises and shines with a high-fiber cereal such as SmartBran sprinkled into protein-rich Greek yogurt or cottage cheese. That’s paired with fibrous fruit such as blueberries or raspberries, and coffee or tea.

    Snacks can be the high-fiber crackers that Kelly raved about to Moore on the air (spread with peanut butter) or ricotta cheese sprinkled with cinnamon.

    And clients can drink as much alcohol as they want - as long as they stick to wine and spirits. Sugary mixed drinks and beer are out.

    “A glass of wine is 90 calories. A roll with butter is 360. Your morning muffin is almost 600. The wine is not the problem here,” says Zuckerbrot. “The calories in alcohol are negligible compared to overall caloric intake.”

    The F-Factor plan adapts to a power player’s jet-setting lifestyle. Zuckerbrot and her team can counsel will pull up the menu at Cipriani or a corner deli and tell clients which dishes fit the F-Factor philosophy.

    “My clients don’t want to sit at home. People work hard and play hard,” says Zuckerbrot. “Megyn Kelly is not quitting her job to go to some ranch for a month to lose weight. She’s not sticking to frozen dinners when she needs to dine at the Four Seasons with colleagues to talk business. This is a sustainable plan people can take on the road with them.”

    MEGYN KELLY’S F-FACTOR MENU

    Breakfast

    Smoothie (made with 1 scoop protein powder, 1/2 cup high fiber cereal, 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or water, 1 cup raspberries)

    Coffee with splash of milk or half & half

    Lunch

    Turkey chili, no beans (made with 93% lean ground turkey breast, veggies and tomatoes)

    Top with nonfat plain Greek yogurt

    2 high-fiber crackers on the side or crumbled on top as croutons

    Water, V8 juice or other zero-calorie beverage

    Snack

    “Pizza” (made with 4 high-fiber crackers, 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese, spoonful of spicy red pepper sauce and grated Parmesan cheese)

    Water, hot tea

    Dinner

    Asian chicken salad (made with 4 ounces chicken breast, 3 cups sliced carrots/cabbage/broccoli/spinach/scallions tossed in peanut dressing made with powdered peanut butter/rice wine vinegar/soy sauce/Asian spices)

    Optional: 2 high-fiber crackers crushed on top for crunch

    1 glass wine

    Water or sugar-free beverage

    Dessert, if desired:

    1 additional glass of wine

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    McDonald’s kale salad packs more calories, fat and salt than a Big Mac 

    BY NICOLE LYN PESCE        Thursday, February 4, 2016, 10:18 AM | NY Daily News

    McDonaldsWhat the kale?

    One of McDonald’s new salads tossed with the leafy green superfood has more calories, fat and salt than a Big Mac.

    The Premium Southwest Salad with Buttermilk Crispy Chicken starts with a nutritious, low-calorie base of baby spinach and baby kale.

    But once you pile on the buttermilk-battered chicken, cheddar and jack cheeses, chili-lime tortilla strips, black beans and corn - and then pour on that Newman’s Own creamy ranch dressing - the salad bowl balloons to 710 calories, 43 grams of fat and 1,330 milligrams of salt.

    The Premium Bacon Ranch Salad, which adds bacon to the buttermilk-battered chicken dish, weighs in at 690 calories, 45 grams of fat and 1,530 milligrams of salt.

    Bring on the beef: A Big Mac stacked with two beef patties, American cheese, pickles, onions, lettuce and special sauce, in comparison, weighs in at 540 calories, 28 grams of fat and 970 milligrams of salt.

    “I applaud McDonald’s for expanding their menu, but this is disappointing,” says Manhattan dietitian Tanya Zuckerbrot.

    “They could have delivered a really healthy salad to offset some of the more unhealthy options on the menu, and some of these ingredients are so obviously calorically dense,” she adds. “It’s like, would you like some kale with your toppings?”

    It gets worse. Canadian news site CBC found even heftier “healthy” salads north of the border.

    The Golden Arches’ “Keep Calm, Caesar On” salad bowl served with baby kale sabotages itself with seasoned crispy chicken, bacon, garlic focaccia croutons, parmesan cheese petals and a creamy Asiago Caesar dressing that top out at a whopping 730 calories, 53 grams of fat and 1,400 milligrams of salt. That’s worse than the Double Big Mac - which isn’t even on McDonald’s menus in the States, unless you ask your server to double the already weighty Big Mac. The four beef patties, processed cheese slices, pickles, onions and lettuce slathered in special sauce on a bun has just 680 calories, 38 grams of fat and 1,340 milligrams of sodium compared to the killer kale salad.

    The American Heart Association recommends eating just 2,000 milligrams of sodium a day, and a person trying to maintain their weight should eat between 1,200 and 1,500 calories.

    “You’re getting almost half of your caloric needs for the day and 50% of your sodium intake in just one of these salads,” marvels Zuckerbrot.

    The fast food chain is having an identify crisis as it tries to keep its comfort-food base hungry for the burgers, fries and breakfast sandwiches that made it a global juggernaut.

    An ad campaign early in 2015 told vegetarians to “kindly avert your eyes” because “you can’t get juiciness like this from soy or quinoa.” It also boasted that it would never serve kale on a burger.

    But then McDonalds turned the tables by rolling out three kale salads in Canada later in the year, and adding kale and spinach to $4 breakfast bowls in California to lure in customers worried about super-sizing themselves.

    McDonald’s reps have yet to respond to requests for comment.

    Not all of the burger chain’s salads are salt and calorie bombs, however. Zuckerbrot suggests swapping your crispy chicken out for grilled chicken in the same Premium Southwest Salad, and hold the creamy dressing, cheese and tortilla strips to make the dish a more palatable 230 calories, 5 grams of fat and 740 milligrams of sodium.

    Or a side salad of baby spinach and kale, mixed greens and grape tomatoes is just 15 calories and 10 milligrams of salt with zero fat if you hold the dressing.

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    BIKINI BOOT CAMP: F FACTOR'S WEIGHT LOSS TIPS

    FEB.1,2016 | BIKINI.COM

    GranolaOur two-week Bikini Boot Camp aims to give you all the resources you need to get your February body ready for the beach.

    The holidays might be long gone, but for some of us they left more than gifts under the tree — those few extra pounds gained during the festive meals and parties of November and December are definitely not invited on our winter holiday. There are so many different theories on the best way to shed pounds quick, but the one we've zeroed in on (because it works!) is dietician Tanya Zuckerbrot's F-Factor diet. Fiber is the star, along with a healthy range of lean proteins and tons of greens. The fiber partners with protein to fill you up and curb cravings, and also helps optimize digestion.

    We asked F-Factor dietician Danielle Hamo for her top quick weight loss tips and a few go-to recipes to turn to when we want to eat diet-friendly. Her sensible approach is totally reasonable, and therefore pretty easy to adopt, especially in the long-term if you're looking to drop a few pounds before a special occasion or beach escape. Here are her tips for diet success:

    1. Each meal and snack should have a fiber component and a lean protein (2 oz) component. Protein in a diet is important because it has a high satiety value and keeps you full with eating less. Protein also helps preserve lean body mass aka muscle during weight loss. Lean body mass is the active weight that burns calories at rest versus fat which is inactive and does nothing at rest. Fat is what you target when you want to lose weight. 

    2. Choose lean proteins like low fat and fat free Greek yogurt, skinless chicken breast, most fish and shellfish, 97% ground beef, turkey bacon, lentils, beans, and low fat ricotta and cottage cheese. Include 3-4 oz. of lean protein at every meal.

    3. Choose high fiber foods such as grains like quinoa, farro, and whole-wheat cous cous, vegetables like broccoli, artichokes, summer squash, and asparagus. The fruit highest in fiber are berries, with blackberries, blueberries, and raspberries offering 5-8 g fiber per serving. 

    4. To make sure you get enough fiber during the day, and set the right tone for the day start with high fiber cereal for breakfast and to get protein eat it with Greek yogurt and berries for sweetness. Good high fiber cereal is anything with more than 6g of fiber per serving; try FiberOne, All Bran, and Kashi Go Lean.

    Meal Suggestions

    Breakfast:1/2 cup of high fiber cereal, 1 6oz. portion of non-fat plain greek yogurt (ike Fage or Chobani) and 1/2 cup berries. Add a little honey/agave/splenda or 2 tablespoons of almond milk to yogurt to lend a creamy consistency and sweeten the tang a bit, if desired. I suggest always choosing plain non-fat yogurt and add a teaspoon of sweetener if needed, rather than fruit flavored yogurt, which can have 30+ grams of sugar ( that's 7-8 teaspoons of sugar—you would never add that much yourself!) 

    Lunch/Dinner

    Zucchini 'Pasta' 2 zucchinis spiralized into pasta, eat raw or sautéed, with tomato sauce or pesto. Add 3-4 oz of grilled chicken breast/tofu/low fat ricotta cheese for protein. 

    Loaded Cauliflower (a great substitute for potato). Steam a head of cauliflower, mash it into chunks (strain any water), put on a baking sheet and top with 1/4 cup fat free/ low fat shredded cheddar or mozzarella cheese, and season with garlic powder, onion powder, or ranch seasoning packet. Bake for 30 minutes on 350 degrees, and top with non-fat Greek yogurt prior to serving as an alternative to sour cream.

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    Here's What Health Experts Think About That "Taco Cleanse" Everyone's Obsessing Over

    BY RENEE JACQUES, ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR, JANUARY 5, 2016 | ALLURE

    TacoCleansYou've probably read about it somewhere by now: There's this new book that came out in December called The Taco Cleanse, and in it, the authors make a satirical argument for eating tacos for every single meal, every single day. The authors of the book (who call themselves "taco scientists") created the food plan after eating only vegan tacos for three meals a day for an entire month as part of a food challenge. They then turned their dietary adventure into an comprehensive guide with a detailed food plan, advising people to replace every meal each day with a vegan taco. And while the book has a jokey tone (the authors suggest filling the tacos with beer-battered mushrooms and tater tots), we wondered whether the "taco cleanse" could possibly be up to the standards of some top nutritionists. So, before you jump for joy and head out to the grocery store to stock up on tortillas, here's what they think of the taco diet. Brooke Alpert, a registered dietician and the author of The Sugar Detox, says that eating only tacos every day could actually help you lose weight—but not in a healthy way. "Any diet—whether it's watermelon, McDonald's, or tacos—can help you lose weight by restricting what you are eating both in options and calories. You could have a slice of pizza as every meal throughout the day and most likely lose weight, but you won't be getting the key nutrients that are necessary for total health," she says. "I like that a lot of the tacos that they offer are vegan, but otherwise, I think it's missing the 'healthy' point of view. This sounds like a fun diet to try to do for a day, but as a registered dietitian, I can't recommend that it's a lifestyle option." Expanding on the notion that it's an unhealthy diet option, Catherine Hauser, a registered dietitian at F-Factor Nutrition, considers the taco diet to be the exact opposite of a cleanse. "Dietary cleanses typically remove potentially harmful or defiling foods or beverages from being consumed, and the 'taco cleanse' is quite the opposite. Battered and fried foods, processed sugar, and unnecessary saturated fat are touted in this cleanse," she says. "Also, limiting nutrients to what can fit in a taco with 'only one fold,' as described by the authors, is very likely preventing an adequate intake of vitamins, minerals, and possibly calories. The size constraint may also provide too few calories. This can slow metabolism, preventing weight loss and cause weight gain once a more normal eating pattern is resumed." So again: Not a good idea, if you ask her. However, Marion Nestle, the Paulette Goddard professor in the department of nutrition, food studies, and public health at New York University, has a slightly different take. This meal plan could help you lose weight, she says, but stresses that it's by no means "a cleanse," because there is no such thing as a cleanse. "Except for colonoscopies, we don't need cleanses. The body cleanses itself," she says. "Any diet that reduced calories will work, and diets based on one food are tiresome and encourage people to eat less. Like all such diets, the taco diet—delicious as tacos are—should help people lose weight out of boredom if nothing else." So to sum up, it's probably not a great idea to go on a taco cleanse. Insert sad-face emoji and taco emoji here. Could anyone else really go for a taco right now, though?" ["post_title"]=> string(92) "Allure: Here's What Health Experts Think About That "Taco Cleanse" Everyone's Obsessing Over" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(80) "heres-what-health-experts-think-about-that-taco-cleanse-everyones-obsessing-over" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-02-27 00:06:45" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-02-27 00:06:45" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=4689" ["menu_order"]=> int(4) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [10]=> object(WP_Post)#1065 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5477) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 15:32:31" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 15:32:31" ["post_content"]=> string(24439) "

    Platt vs. Fat : Can a food critic diet successfully? 

    By  September 8, 2016 (Via Grubstreet [caption id="attachment_5484" align="aligncenter" width="600"]This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption]

    This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine

    Like the many experts I’ve consulted during the course of countless protein diets, Mediterranean diets, all-fruit diets, and assorted other doomed starvation regimes over the decades, Tanya Zuckerbrot exudes the kind of practiced optimism that skinny, type-A, successful professionals often do. There’s a small stone statue of the Buddha in her posh midtown offices, a soothing, white-toned space that feels less like a medical-consultation room than like something you’d see on the set of The View. There’s also a juddering, yellowish piece of rubber made to look like a five-pound chunk of fat, which she likes to use as a motivational tool; a doctor’s scale that is recalibrated every day; and, framed on the wall among her first-class dietitian degrees, a signed poster of the toothy, grinning televangelist Joel Osteen. Zuckerbrot, who charges corporate-lawyer fees ($15,000 for ten visits) to reveal the secrets of her popular F-Factor Method, often quotes Osteen to her prominent high-roller clients and has seen him in person at least three times, which, as she puts it, “is a lot of times to see Joel Osteen for a nice Jewish girl like me.”
    During our first visit together, Zuckerbrot gives me cheerful tips on how to avoid the temptations of the several Peking-duck dinners it’s my professional duty to devour that week (“Forget those pancakes, Adam, and just taste the skin!”), and how to behave at the cocktail function I’m about to attend (“Anything on a skewer is your best friend, Adam!”). She’s studied my first-ever “F-Factor Journal,” a slightly comical document that includes carefully recorded visits to Sparks Steak House to gorge on slabs of sirloin. She’s weighed me (a hefty 273 pounds), measured my body fat (a totally obese 31.3 percent), and assured me that although I am technically diabetic and a few pounds short of morbidly obese, this isn’t such a tragic state of affairs, because roughly two-thirds of the entire country is overweight or obese these days, Adam. But most important of all, I’m here today in her office, and if I follow the steps of her F-Factor diet, everything will work out. Except that in the realm of mega-super-diets, as in the realm of ecstatic religious conversions, and indeed almost anything you can name in that great tragicomedy called life, both Zuckerbrot and I know better than anyone that things don’t always work out in the end. Which is possibly why, when I show up for my second session the following week, with another slightly comical food diary, penned in my tiny, earnest, indecipherable big man’s handwriting, Zuckerbrot — who is dressed, as usual, in designer clothes and a pair of red-soled Christian Louboutins — looks for the briefest second like she’s just seen a giant, overfed ghost. “I’ve been thinking about you, Adam,” she says, grinning a slightly pained grin. “I was worried that you’d never come back again!” Who could blame her for being nervous? As anyone who’s even remotely familiar with the grim statistics on long-term weight loss knows, diets are made to be broken, especially by mountain-size professional gourmands whose job it is to consume anywhere from 3,000 to 10,000 calories during a normal working day. As Zuckerbrot will tell me, she also has a reputation to think of (“I’ll be honest, Adam, I don’t like failure, and given your profession, I’ve had my concerns”). Plus, unlike the assorted gilded uptown housewives, corpulent Wall Street CEOs, calorie-conscious anchors, and aspiring supermodels (among many other things, Zuckerbrot is the “Official Nutritionist to the Miss Universe Organization”) who make up her devoted F-Factor flock, I won’t be forking over real money for her special, fiber-rich diet plan, which includes 24/7 availability, the highlight of which is a number to text for counsel during moments of existential panic while loitering guiltily in the Shake Shack line, say, or scanning the menu before ordering your omakase dinner at Nobu. Because — also unlike the rest of her clients — it was my crackpot idea to attempt to lose weight while routinely visiting the city’s finest restaurants. During her most optimistic moments, Zuckerbrot assures me that this is actually not such a crazy idea. As the ultimate F-Factor guinea pig, I could drink alcohol on her diet (although not too much, and no sugar mixed with your spirits, please), and I wouldn’t be punishing myself with brutal cardio workouts, which stimulate the appetite. Proteins are great, but not the overly fatty kind. And because I would be taking my carbohydrates not in the normal pasta-and-bread-basket form but from an endless stream of distressingly tasteless Scandinavian bran crackers, I would feel full without tipping too far into a zombified state. I would, in the process, learn to taste my restaurant dinners instead of ingesting them, the way I was used to, like a great blue whale sucks up clouds of tiny shrimp in the deep-blue sea. Like most portly food lovers, I’d attempted to control my appetite in a hundred different ways over the years. I’d experimented with trendy juice cleanses, buzzy taurine-spiked protein powders, and two-day-a-week fasting regimes. About a decade ago, I’d dutifully lost 50 pounds under the care of another nutritionist, before gaining all the weight back during the course of a delirious, yearlong fatso binge. I’d even visited my share of what A. J. Liebling, the patron saint of all giant, blue-whale food writers, contemptuously referred to as slimming prisons, where I’d huffed up and down arid desert hillsides before returning to the life of leisurely, booze-filled luncheons and furtive midnight ice cream. But Liebling famously ate himself into the grave at age 59, and as I entered those same choppy late-middle-age waters, with two small daughters and an increasingly skinny, perplexed wife, it was time to take one last, gasping lunge at the golden ring of good health. After my latest checkup, our long-suffering family doctor, whom I’ll call Dr. P, had called with a note of alarm in his voice, sounding, it later occurred to me, like the engineer of some listing, recently stricken ocean liner, making a last, desperate call to the bridge. Dr. P and I had had our little emergencies before, of course. There was the kidney stone I’d misdiagnosed as a bad case of indigestion after a particularly fierce Sichuan dinner, and the time I returned from a Champagne-fueled junket to El Bulli with a flaming case of gout. But this was a different kind of emergency. My numbers were spiking. He was prescribing cholesterol-lowering statins for the first time, and horse-size pills to control my suddenly diabetic blood-sugar levels, and he suggested I consider making a change, after years of unchecked grazing, in what he diplomatically called my “professional eating habits.” For a month or two, I’d tried changing my professional eating habits on my own, and even asked a few of my bemused colleagues for their on-the-job diet tips. Alan Richman, who’s managed to remain remarkably trim during the course of his long, award-winning dining career, wished me luck on my quest, and joked that the key to his good health was avoiding bread baskets and taking the stairs whenever possible, including walking several times a day up and down the staircase of his large suburban home. Mimi Sheraton said she’d added 70 pounds to her small frame while gorging herself as the chief Times restaurant critic during the ’70s and ’80s. It took her five years of light eating as a regular civilian to take the weight off, but my dining schedule was less punishing than hers, so who knows — maybe a miracle would occur. “Don’t let this job kill ya,” Mimi said one evening, as she watched me forking the food from everyone’s plates during one of my working dinners. ”It’s not worth it!” [caption id="attachment_5483" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption] On the first day of my great diet adventure, I whir up a breakfast smoothie made of swampy-colored hemp protein powder, frozen blueberries, and almond milk. It looks (and tastes) like frozen plasterboard. Lunch is two lox sandwiches made with a scrim of yogurt and four compressed, F-Factor-approved wheat-bran crackers from Norway, which taste like dried lawn-mower clippings and have the texture of flattened Brillo pads. After another cracker snack, dinner is a visit to not one but two steakhouses in search of the city’s finest cut of New York strip, which I taste in tiny little bites while primly pushing the boats of creamed spinach and ruinous potato dishes aside. I repeat my smoothie-and-cracker routine the next day, and the day after that, and after another modest Peking-duck dinner of mostly scallions, hoisin sauce, and delectably crispy skin, and a visit to a trendy vegetarian restaurant, I take the night off and sit in front of the television in a dazed, semi-starved state, watching reruns of Naked and Afraid. Not that this is so unpleasant. Like the bewildered contestants on that greatest of all reality-TV diet shows, I can feel my stomach contracting, even after just a few days of roaming around on this new calorie-deprived savanna. “I’m beginning to notice a change in your eating habits,” Mrs. Platt says suspiciously when she comes home to find me sitting at the kitchen table eating my salad and crackers, instead of standing over the sink devouring last night’s congealed restaurant leftovers, along with the remnants of the girls’ macaroni-and-cheese dinner, like I sometimes do. Nine days after my first visit, I return again to the F-Factor offices, where Zuckerbrot greets me nervously. We discuss the concept of thermogenesis, which is the process behind her fiber-rich philosophy (whereby the body burns calories in its attempt to digest fiber), and her distaste for the way most people use the word diet (it means “a pattern of eating,” not a temporary weight-loss program). Like lots of neurotic pudgy people, I have an aversion to being weighed, so when I lumber onto her scale, I hum to myself and look up at the ceiling. She adjusts the weights, and as I keep humming to myself, she falls quiet for a time. “Would you believe it, Adam?” she finally says, in a shaky way, like someone having an ecstatic experience at a Joel Osteen event. “You’ve lost 14 pounds.” According to a gadget called the Omron Body Fat Analyzer, I’ve shed ten pounds of fat in a little over a week, plus some additional water weight. Extreme weight loss isn’t uncommon at the beginning of diets, and given my size, this isn’t a huge amount in percentage terms. Still, this is exciting. The complex fiber has balanced my sugar levels while making me feel full, and deprived of the usual all-you-can-eat buffet of refined carbohydrates, my body has been burning fat. “There’s a thin guy buried inside of you, Adam,” she says, using the simple metaphors of the practiced evangelist. “We are pouring the cement down now. Once we build a good foundation, we will build a healthy house.” To celebrate, Zuckerbrot introduces a new cracker into my dining routine, one sweetened pleasantly with raisins and traces of honey. She explains that the F-Factor diet didn’t begin as a slimming diet, in the usual sense of the word. She’d found her secret-weapon crackers, called “GG Bran Crispbreads,” on the dusty bottom shelf of the health store across from her apartment while looking for ways to lower cholesterol and manage blood-sugar levels for cardiovascular and type-2-diabetes patients she was working with after graduating with her master’s in nutrition and food studies from NYU. After three months of ingesting industrial amounts of fiber, her diabetes patients found that in addition to lowering their blood sugar, they’d lost considerable weight. Soon, non-diabetics were clamoring for diet tips, and when celebrities began signing on (Megyn Kelly, Katie Couric), her career took off. I enjoy my new honey-flavored crackers that evening, before visiting a poultry-themed French bistro called Le Coq Rico, where my dining party and I order two whole chickens, a fat slab of foie gras encased in pastry, and a whole roasted guinea fowl. “What’s the matter, are you ill?” asks one of my guests as I take a bite of each of these delicacies and spend the rest of dinner moving their remains around my plate. On the contrary, I’ve never felt better, which is how new dieters, like new members of any sect, tend to feel during the first, heady days of conversion. I experience bizarre surges of energy, and instead of slouching off to the coffee bar for a post-lunch pick-me-up, I begin taking jaunty afternoon power walks. Food writers tend to fall into two broad categories: those who describe the experience of the meal (Liebling, Calvin Trillin) and those who obsessively chronicle the actual tastes that appear on the plate (Craig Claiborne, Richard Olney). I’ve always considered myself a bumbling, very junior member of the former group, but as I drop three pounds the next session and four more two weeks after that, I begin regaling my startled fresser colleagues with flowery descriptions of the sugary snap of fresh garden carrots. “Now, this is what’s called ‘depth of flavor,’ ” I hear myself proclaim one evening at the fine new Village bistro Mimi. The subject of my enthusiasm, I dimly recall, is a helping of plump, hand-rolled gnocchi, which a couple of short weeks ago I would have hoovered up without comment. But after being relentlessly carpet-bombed with Nordic bran, my taste buds react like they’re experiencing the buttery softness of this Italian dumpling for the first time, a sensation which is repeated as we move from the gnocchi, to the pot of coarsely mashed, properly fatty pork rillettes (“Can you taste those porky barnyard notes?”) on to rhubarb-flavored soufflé (“As light as a balloon!”) for dessert. It doesn’t take long, after years of public grumpiness, for this bizarrely optimistic new tone to creep into my work. “You’re getting soft, Platty,” my editor says as he reads the draft of yet another three-star write-up (three stars out of five being “generally ecstatic” on the tortured Platt scale). Often I’ll go long months without writing a three-star review, especially in this era of clamorous little bar-restaurants and overhyped comfort foods. But I’ve written three during the early stages of my dieting binge, extolling the virtues of everything from pork sandwiches to wood-fired pizza pies. Sure, I’ve turned out the usual jaded critic’s observations in between these love letters, but maybe it’s true, as Zuckerbrot has prophesied, that my new, more measured eating habits will rekindle my love affair with food. But as any nutritionist or serial dieter will tell you, if losing weight is relatively easy, your chances of keeping your appetite in check over time are roughly the same as your summiting the ten highest peaks on the planet without the benefit of oxygen. By an optimistic measure, four out of five people fail to maintain weight loss after a year. Besides, if by some miracle you do manage to shed those extra 50 pounds, it takes years for the complex metabolic triggers that control the appetite to adjust to your new, lighter weight — and some experts think that this never happens. Until that time, the body’s keen metabolic sensors are in protective starvation mode, sending pulsating siren calls throughout your svelte new form via the dimly understood parts of the brain that control that complex jumble of cues we call “appetite.” Which is probably why, weeks into my diet — after conveniently forgetting to record anything in my food diary, consuming an entire 20-course tasting dinner at Blue Hill at Stone Barns (“That’s not on the Daddy Diet,” my horrified daughter says, watching Daddy cram chunks of delicious, fresh-baked chocolate-and-cherry bread down his giant maw), and enjoying a furtive late-night snack of leftover Bonchon fried-chicken wings — the Omron Body Fat Analyzer records that I’ve gained back two pounds of fat. This news happens to coincide with the release of a dispiriting, and widely reported study by researchers a the National Institute of Health who spent years following doomed members of NBC’s Biggest Loser as they relentlessly gained back the hundreds of pounds they’d lost on the show. Predictably, Tanya doesn’t have much time for the Biggest Loser phenomenon (“You can’t expect those poor people to exercise like lunatics for eight hours a day when they get home, Adam!”). We discuss the difference between “hunger,” which is a physiological state (your stomach grumbles, you feel irritable and light-headed, etc.), and “appetite,” which is a murky, psychological one, susceptible to all kinds of imaginary and inherited cues, especially in the funhouse world of restaurants where things like plate size (larger ones make you eat more) and menu descriptions (“succulent,” “fresh baked”) are all carefully manipulated to seduce diners into downing calories like hogs at a trough. “If you don’t want to become another statistic, you can’t eat your restaurant dinners like a normal fat American,” Zuckerbrot says, furrowing her carefully penciled brow in a gently disapproving way. “Mindful indulgence” is this week’s mantra, and for good measure she relates motivational stories about fleshy business-mogul clients who fork over thousands of dollars for her nutritional secrets but in the end never lose a single pound. “Character flows through people like a river,” she says, fixing me with one of her mesmerizing stares. “You know what they say, Adam: If you cheat on your taxes, you’ll cheat in life.” I try not to cheat that week, or the week after, but lumbering slowly around town on my gastronomic rounds, furtively ingesting fiber-cracker snacks in the backs of taxicabs, the magic goal of 20 percent body fat seems like an increasingly distant, Sisyphean task. But as the visits tick by, the Omron Body Fat numbers begin slowly to creep downward, from 28.3 percent (“Anything more than three bites is not mindful indulgence for a man like you!”) to 26.4 percent (“We’re counting carbs, not calories, Adam. Remember, there’s 40 grams of carbs in that cup of quinoa, so when you order one of those bowls, it’s like eating three slices of Wonder Bread!”) to a promising but still very obese 26 percent. The week before my last official visit to the F-Factor offices, I attend two weddings. I write another glowing, three-star review, this time of a new Chinese restaurant in the Village where, among other things, I enjoy two kinds of cold Sichuan-style chicken, several excellent varieties of regional noodle specialties, and an ethereal bowl of rice and tomato soup crowned with strands of fresh watercress. Zuckerbrot has recently gotten engaged, so strips of celebratory pink and white paper bunting are strung up around the white-toned office. When I clamber on the scale, I weigh in at 235 pounds, which is approximately 40 pounds less than when I’d begun my diet experiment. And despite those wedding indulgences, my body fat is also down again, although only by a meager tenth of one percent. Despite the festive decorations, Zuckerbrot’s not in much of a celebratory mood, although, for some reason, I am. When I tell her it’s time to take the training wheels off and chart my own, wobbly dietary course, at least for a while, she regales me with more horror stories about clients who’ve lost over 100 pounds, failed to follow the F-Factor maintenance program (which carries a price tag of $6,000), and returned a year later fatter than ever. She reminds me that I’m still technically obese (“You have 15 pounds to go, Adam; you can’t enjoy yourself yet!”) and that I’ll need “wiggle room” to gain a few pounds, given my hazardous occupation. She cautions me against feeling pleased with myself, because when fat people feel self-satisfied, they tend to reward themselves with buckets of fried chicken. I assure her that those days are over. It’s my plan to lose even more weight over the next couple of weeks, in preparation for my triumphant checkup with Dr. P. I dutifully ingest my crackers that afternoon, and later that evening, at a new French restaurant downtown, I order a congratulatory martini, followed by the relatively slimming fillet of sole, which I enjoy along with a few chaste little tastes of crackly skinned duck breast and several fatty bites of a delicious $43 lamb chop. There are also a few sips of Vouvray (’09 Le Clos de la Meslerie, for the record), followed by a grand flotilla of French desserts — crystal saucers filled with apricots and sorbet, a classic opera cake flecked with gold leaf on top. I take a bite of the little cake, then put down my spoon for a while, but when coffee comes, I take another bite, and then another, and before I know it, the dessert is gone. *A version of this article appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Download a PDF of the original article here.
    " ["post_title"]=> string(56) "New York Magazine Food Critic Loses Weight with F-Factor" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "new-york-magazine-food-critic-loses-weight-f-factor" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 17:36:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 17:36:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5477" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [11]=> object(WP_Post)#1046 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5349) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:28:33" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-21 14:28:33" ["post_content"]=> string(14576) "By David Zinczenko July 20, 2016 (Via EAT THIS NOT THAT

    “I don’t like to get political,” said my friend Jessica a few months back. “But I’d totally vote for Megyn Kelly.”

    megyn-kelly-diet-main The Fox News anchor was making headlines that week for “clearing the air” with Donald Trump, landing an interview after they scuffled at a Republican Primary debate. A few months before, she appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair. And of course she’s been in the headlines this week, joining the lineup of other women who have said they were sexually harassed by their boss, head of Fox News. Meanwhile, she remains one of the channel’s brightest stars—and a powerhouse on social media, with 2+ million followers. Like my friend Jessica, we here at Eat This, Not That! don’t like to get political, but we recognize a powerhouse when we see one—and we know Megyn Kelly is powered by food. In fact, Tanya Zuckerbrot, RD, the author of Kelly's favorite diet book, F-Factor, has been a regular contributor to eatthis.com, so we couldn’t help but ask her to share her best weight loss tips and how to eat your way to a successful life, as a successful woman. Republican, Democrat, Vegetarian, Flexitarian—anyone can appreciate this essential list of the top tips for success on the F-Factor Diet, written exclusively for Eat This, Not That! by Zuckerbrot herself. And to lose even more weight, with proven advice from celebrity nutritionists and trainers, don't miss this essential list of 50 Best-Ever Weight-Loss Secrets From Skinny People!

    EAT CARBS TO LOSE WEIGHT 

    ...BUT THE RIGHT ONES 

    megyn-kelly-diet-berriesSo often dieters cut out carbohydrates in an attempt to lose weight. But carbs fuel our bodies and cutting them out leads to you feeling tired, cranky and weak. This can trigger excess snacking and feeling deprived which is not consistent with weight loss. And yet while eating carbohydrates is essential to functioning, eating them in excess does lead to weight gain. The goal is to eat just the right amount of the right carbs. Some of my favorites include bran, low-sugar fiber cereals, apples, pears, artichokes, berries and broccoli.

    NOT JUST ANY CARBS

    EAT FIBER

    The F-Factor Diet is a high fiber foods program, and eating fiber is essential to success. It allows you to eat the carbohydrates necessary for energy without gaining weight. I love fiber because it’s the zero-calorie, non-digestible part of a carbohydrate that adds bulk to food. When eaten, fiber swells in the stomach. Therefore, when you follow a diet rich in fiber (like F-Factor) you feel full after eating and you’ll generally eat less throughout the day, leading to weight loss. Not to mention, fiber absorbs and removes fat and calories, and boosts metabolism! 

    EAT BREAKFASTmegyn-kelly-diet-breakfast

    EVEN IF YOU DON’T WANT TO

    Skipping breakfast slows down metabolism and leads to weight gain. Breakfast jump-starts your metabolism for the day, making it extremely important to consume. Studies show that breakfast eaters burn calories more efficiently throughout the day and are more likely to be thinner than non-breakfast eaters. In fact, sumo wrestlers in Japan aren't fed breakfast, so that they gain weight! Eating breakfast is key to success on the F-Factor Diet because it is an opportunity to meet up to half your daily fiber needs before noon. Examples I enjoy: high fiber cereal or overnight oats with lean protein such as egg whites, Greek yogurt, or low-fat cheeses are the ultimate combination because these nutrients will fill you up on the fewest calories and keep blood sugar stable all morning.

    ENJOY FIBER AND PROTEIN AT EVERY MEAL

    ...MAKING LOSING WEIGHT NO BIG DEAL

    Clinical evidence shows that fiber and protein have a high satiety benefit in calorie-controlled diets and in weight reduction. The combination keeps you feeling full, for the longest period of time, on the fewest calories. The fuller you feel after a meal, the less likely you’ll be to overeat at the next meal; and, therefore, the more likely you’ll be to lose weight. Eating small meals throughout the day also keeps metabolism burning efficiently and prevents excessive hunger (which can lead to clouded judgment when selecting foods and overeating at the next meal). Many people believe that by skipping meals, they will save on calories, and lose more weight. However, skipping meals may inhibit weight loss and even lead to weight gain over time. Here’s why: When your body is deprived of food for many hours between meals, it starts conserving fuel and burning fewer calories to protect itself from starving. Your metabolism slows down, therefore inhibiting weight loss despite reduced caloric intake. In addition, skipping meals causes sugar levels to begin to drop. Low blood sugar can produce sudden hunger pangs, which can trigger bingeing and food cravings. Blood sugar levels begin to drop within two hours of eating, which is why successful F-Factor Dieters aim to eat 4 small meals a day: breakfast (no later than an hour after rising), lunch, snack and dinner at 4-5 hour intervals.(Related: The 36 Top Peanut Butters—Ranked.)

    CHANGE YOUR LIFE

    WITHOUT CHANGING YOUR LIFESTYLE

    Temporary solutions tend to equal temporary results; permanent changes can lead to permanent weight loss, and to keep changes permanent a dieter needs a plan that allows them to live their life. The most successful long term F-Factor dieters are the ones who continue their lives, eating at their favorite restaurants, socializing with friends and drinking healthy alcoholic drinks. The more restricted a person is, the more likely they are to drop a lifestyle change. Positive habits come from enjoying the activities you love and a meal plan that is appropriate to them. Drinking and dieting can go hand in hand. When people cut out alcohol they can lose weight; however, once they start drinking again, they gain it back. On the F-Factor Diet drinking alcohol is allowed from Day 1. On F-Factor, you have the freedom to dine out anywhere, or cook for yourself if you want. You have the freedom to drink alcohol and more free time too since life with F-Factor doesn’t require you to spend hours at the gym.

    DITCH THE TREADMILL

    AND PICK UP THE WEIGHTS (IF YOU BOTHER WITH THE GYM AT ALL)

    Diet trumps exercise when it comes to weight loss. However, strength training is an excellent choice to complement a healthful diet like F-Factor. There are benefits to strength training over cardiovascular activity for weight loss: It takes a long time to burn foods with cardiovascular activities. Eating one slice of pizza (~350 calories) would take 59 minutes of walking (at an average of 3.5 calories per minute) to burn off. Cardio (in running, elliptical, walking) also stimulates appetite and leaves people feeling hungry, so they end up eating more than if they hadn’t worked out. Additionally, often in rapid weight loss, people lose muscle mass as well as fat mass. Maintenance of lean muscle mass is very important in weight loss, mainly because muscle burns more than fat. In fact, women lose half a pound of muscle every year starting from age 30 regardless of if they are losing weight! An important goal for women in exercise should be to preserve muscle mass. Strength/resistance training is more effective than cardiovascular activity in preservation of precious muscle mass. A study done by the Journal of Applied Physiology showed that resistance training significantly increased lean body mass in participants, while cardiovascular exercise significantly decreased it. (Related: 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter!_

    DRINK MORE WATER

    KEEPING A WATER BOTTLE BY YOUR SIDE

    Drinking water is especially important on the F-Factor Diet because of the high amount of fiber F-Factor Dieters consume. When fiber combines with water, it forms a soft gel, which leads to firm stools and allows for easy defecation. On the other hand, if you eat a lot of fiber and don’t compensate by drinking more water, it can lead to the opposite effect—constipation. (Enjoy a cup of green tea, too.) Being dehydrated can also mimic hunger. Many times, our hunger is really just thirst in disguise and you can experience symptoms such as feeling weak, cranky and tired. To get rid of these symptoms we then grab a candy bar when all we really needed was a drink of zero-calorie water. And finally, water plays a key role in nearly every bodily function and it fills you up so you tend to eat less!

    CATCH THOSE ZZZS

    7.5 HOURS WORTH, AT LEAST

    The amount and quality of your sleep affects the hormones (leptin and ghrelin) that control feelings of hunger and fullness, thus impacting weight loss efforts. Ghrelin, which is produced in the GI tract, stimulates appetite, causing you to feel hungry. Leptin, which is produced in the fat cells, is responsible for sending a signal to your brain that you are full. When you’re well rested these hormones work in balance; however, when you are sleep deprived, leptin levels plummet and ghrelin levels rise, setting the stage for overeating or one to many cheat meals. Low leptin levels mean your brain doesn’t get the message you are full/ you don’t feel satisfied after you eat. Elevated ghrelin levels mean stimulated appetite. A University of Chicago 2004 study found that when sleep was restricted to 4 hrs per night over 2 nights, leptin dropped by 18%, while ghrelin increased by an average of 28%. After sleeping poorly subjects were more inclined to eat sugary, refined carbs. Sleep deprivation also leads to exaggerated feelings of hunger during day, even if we’ve had enough to eat. Aim for 7.5 hours of sleep for a good night’s sleep and help prevent you from overeating the next day. 

    SLOW DOWN, SPEED RACER

    TRY CHOPSTICKS!

    Eating slower helps you to eat less food, because it gives your brain the time needed to register that you are full. A study by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics confirmed that eating slower resulted in fewer calories consumed and higher satiety at meal completion. Using chopsticks or your non-dominant hand to eat are tricks to more eating and slowing down. Eating with chopsticks leads to smaller amounts of food in each mouthful (vs a fork). If you aren’t a natural or advanced chopstick user, this may also mean taking time to put foods on the chopstick and to think mindfully about how to eat, and thus boost your metabolism. Heavy, calorically dense sauces also will slide off of the chopstick vs. when people eat with a spoon.

     

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    (Jae-Ha Kim is a New York Times bestselling author and travel writer. You can respond to this column by visiting her website at www.jaehakim.com. You may also follow "Go Away With..." on Twitter at @GoAwayWithJae where Jae-Ha Kim welcomes your questions and comments.) (c) 2016 JAE-HA KIM DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
    This article was also published online by the LA Times (6/28/16), Chicago Tribune (6/28/2016) and others. " ["post_title"]=> string(49) "Chicago Tribune: Go Away With... Tanya Zuckerbrot" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(32) "tribune-go-away-tanya-zuckerbrot" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 15:24:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-07-13 15:24:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(26) "http://ffactor.com/?p=5270" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(3) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1065 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(5477) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 15:32:31" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-09-08 15:32:31" ["post_content"]=> string(24439) "

    Platt vs. Fat : Can a food critic diet successfully? 

    By  September 8, 2016 (Via Grubstreet [caption id="attachment_5484" align="aligncenter" width="600"]This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption]

    This article originally appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine

    Like the many experts I’ve consulted during the course of countless protein diets, Mediterranean diets, all-fruit diets, and assorted other doomed starvation regimes over the decades, Tanya Zuckerbrot exudes the kind of practiced optimism that skinny, type-A, successful professionals often do. There’s a small stone statue of the Buddha in her posh midtown offices, a soothing, white-toned space that feels less like a medical-consultation room than like something you’d see on the set of The View. There’s also a juddering, yellowish piece of rubber made to look like a five-pound chunk of fat, which she likes to use as a motivational tool; a doctor’s scale that is recalibrated every day; and, framed on the wall among her first-class dietitian degrees, a signed poster of the toothy, grinning televangelist Joel Osteen. Zuckerbrot, who charges corporate-lawyer fees ($15,000 for ten visits) to reveal the secrets of her popular F-Factor Method, often quotes Osteen to her prominent high-roller clients and has seen him in person at least three times, which, as she puts it, “is a lot of times to see Joel Osteen for a nice Jewish girl like me.”
    During our first visit together, Zuckerbrot gives me cheerful tips on how to avoid the temptations of the several Peking-duck dinners it’s my professional duty to devour that week (“Forget those pancakes, Adam, and just taste the skin!”), and how to behave at the cocktail function I’m about to attend (“Anything on a skewer is your best friend, Adam!”). She’s studied my first-ever “F-Factor Journal,” a slightly comical document that includes carefully recorded visits to Sparks Steak House to gorge on slabs of sirloin. She’s weighed me (a hefty 273 pounds), measured my body fat (a totally obese 31.3 percent), and assured me that although I am technically diabetic and a few pounds short of morbidly obese, this isn’t such a tragic state of affairs, because roughly two-thirds of the entire country is overweight or obese these days, Adam. But most important of all, I’m here today in her office, and if I follow the steps of her F-Factor diet, everything will work out. Except that in the realm of mega-super-diets, as in the realm of ecstatic religious conversions, and indeed almost anything you can name in that great tragicomedy called life, both Zuckerbrot and I know better than anyone that things don’t always work out in the end. Which is possibly why, when I show up for my second session the following week, with another slightly comical food diary, penned in my tiny, earnest, indecipherable big man’s handwriting, Zuckerbrot — who is dressed, as usual, in designer clothes and a pair of red-soled Christian Louboutins — looks for the briefest second like she’s just seen a giant, overfed ghost. “I’ve been thinking about you, Adam,” she says, grinning a slightly pained grin. “I was worried that you’d never come back again!” Who could blame her for being nervous? As anyone who’s even remotely familiar with the grim statistics on long-term weight loss knows, diets are made to be broken, especially by mountain-size professional gourmands whose job it is to consume anywhere from 3,000 to 10,000 calories during a normal working day. As Zuckerbrot will tell me, she also has a reputation to think of (“I’ll be honest, Adam, I don’t like failure, and given your profession, I’ve had my concerns”). Plus, unlike the assorted gilded uptown housewives, corpulent Wall Street CEOs, calorie-conscious anchors, and aspiring supermodels (among many other things, Zuckerbrot is the “Official Nutritionist to the Miss Universe Organization”) who make up her devoted F-Factor flock, I won’t be forking over real money for her special, fiber-rich diet plan, which includes 24/7 availability, the highlight of which is a number to text for counsel during moments of existential panic while loitering guiltily in the Shake Shack line, say, or scanning the menu before ordering your omakase dinner at Nobu. Because — also unlike the rest of her clients — it was my crackpot idea to attempt to lose weight while routinely visiting the city’s finest restaurants. During her most optimistic moments, Zuckerbrot assures me that this is actually not such a crazy idea. As the ultimate F-Factor guinea pig, I could drink alcohol on her diet (although not too much, and no sugar mixed with your spirits, please), and I wouldn’t be punishing myself with brutal cardio workouts, which stimulate the appetite. Proteins are great, but not the overly fatty kind. And because I would be taking my carbohydrates not in the normal pasta-and-bread-basket form but from an endless stream of distressingly tasteless Scandinavian bran crackers, I would feel full without tipping too far into a zombified state. I would, in the process, learn to taste my restaurant dinners instead of ingesting them, the way I was used to, like a great blue whale sucks up clouds of tiny shrimp in the deep-blue sea. Like most portly food lovers, I’d attempted to control my appetite in a hundred different ways over the years. I’d experimented with trendy juice cleanses, buzzy taurine-spiked protein powders, and two-day-a-week fasting regimes. About a decade ago, I’d dutifully lost 50 pounds under the care of another nutritionist, before gaining all the weight back during the course of a delirious, yearlong fatso binge. I’d even visited my share of what A. J. Liebling, the patron saint of all giant, blue-whale food writers, contemptuously referred to as slimming prisons, where I’d huffed up and down arid desert hillsides before returning to the life of leisurely, booze-filled luncheons and furtive midnight ice cream. But Liebling famously ate himself into the grave at age 59, and as I entered those same choppy late-middle-age waters, with two small daughters and an increasingly skinny, perplexed wife, it was time to take one last, gasping lunge at the golden ring of good health. After my latest checkup, our long-suffering family doctor, whom I’ll call Dr. P, had called with a note of alarm in his voice, sounding, it later occurred to me, like the engineer of some listing, recently stricken ocean liner, making a last, desperate call to the bridge. Dr. P and I had had our little emergencies before, of course. There was the kidney stone I’d misdiagnosed as a bad case of indigestion after a particularly fierce Sichuan dinner, and the time I returned from a Champagne-fueled junket to El Bulli with a flaming case of gout. But this was a different kind of emergency. My numbers were spiking. He was prescribing cholesterol-lowering statins for the first time, and horse-size pills to control my suddenly diabetic blood-sugar levels, and he suggested I consider making a change, after years of unchecked grazing, in what he diplomatically called my “professional eating habits.” For a month or two, I’d tried changing my professional eating habits on my own, and even asked a few of my bemused colleagues for their on-the-job diet tips. Alan Richman, who’s managed to remain remarkably trim during the course of his long, award-winning dining career, wished me luck on my quest, and joked that the key to his good health was avoiding bread baskets and taking the stairs whenever possible, including walking several times a day up and down the staircase of his large suburban home. Mimi Sheraton said she’d added 70 pounds to her small frame while gorging herself as the chief Times restaurant critic during the ’70s and ’80s. It took her five years of light eating as a regular civilian to take the weight off, but my dining schedule was less punishing than hers, so who knows — maybe a miracle would occur. “Don’t let this job kill ya,” Mimi said one evening, as she watched me forking the food from everyone’s plates during one of my working dinners. ”It’s not worth it!” [caption id="attachment_5483" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine Before and after. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine[/caption] On the first day of my great diet adventure, I whir up a breakfast smoothie made of swampy-colored hemp protein powder, frozen blueberries, and almond milk. It looks (and tastes) like frozen plasterboard. Lunch is two lox sandwiches made with a scrim of yogurt and four compressed, F-Factor-approved wheat-bran crackers from Norway, which taste like dried lawn-mower clippings and have the texture of flattened Brillo pads. After another cracker snack, dinner is a visit to not one but two steakhouses in search of the city’s finest cut of New York strip, which I taste in tiny little bites while primly pushing the boats of creamed spinach and ruinous potato dishes aside. I repeat my smoothie-and-cracker routine the next day, and the day after that, and after another modest Peking-duck dinner of mostly scallions, hoisin sauce, and delectably crispy skin, and a visit to a trendy vegetarian restaurant, I take the night off and sit in front of the television in a dazed, semi-starved state, watching reruns of Naked and Afraid. Not that this is so unpleasant. Like the bewildered contestants on that greatest of all reality-TV diet shows, I can feel my stomach contracting, even after just a few days of roaming around on this new calorie-deprived savanna. “I’m beginning to notice a change in your eating habits,” Mrs. Platt says suspiciously when she comes home to find me sitting at the kitchen table eating my salad and crackers, instead of standing over the sink devouring last night’s congealed restaurant leftovers, along with the remnants of the girls’ macaroni-and-cheese dinner, like I sometimes do. Nine days after my first visit, I return again to the F-Factor offices, where Zuckerbrot greets me nervously. We discuss the concept of thermogenesis, which is the process behind her fiber-rich philosophy (whereby the body burns calories in its attempt to digest fiber), and her distaste for the way most people use the word diet (it means “a pattern of eating,” not a temporary weight-loss program). Like lots of neurotic pudgy people, I have an aversion to being weighed, so when I lumber onto her scale, I hum to myself and look up at the ceiling. She adjusts the weights, and as I keep humming to myself, she falls quiet for a time. “Would you believe it, Adam?” she finally says, in a shaky way, like someone having an ecstatic experience at a Joel Osteen event. “You’ve lost 14 pounds.” According to a gadget called the Omron Body Fat Analyzer, I’ve shed ten pounds of fat in a little over a week, plus some additional water weight. Extreme weight loss isn’t uncommon at the beginning of diets, and given my size, this isn’t a huge amount in percentage terms. Still, this is exciting. The complex fiber has balanced my sugar levels while making me feel full, and deprived of the usual all-you-can-eat buffet of refined carbohydrates, my body has been burning fat. “There’s a thin guy buried inside of you, Adam,” she says, using the simple metaphors of the practiced evangelist. “We are pouring the cement down now. Once we build a good foundation, we will build a healthy house.” To celebrate, Zuckerbrot introduces a new cracker into my dining routine, one sweetened pleasantly with raisins and traces of honey. She explains that the F-Factor diet didn’t begin as a slimming diet, in the usual sense of the word. She’d found her secret-weapon crackers, called “GG Bran Crispbreads,” on the dusty bottom shelf of the health store across from her apartment while looking for ways to lower cholesterol and manage blood-sugar levels for cardiovascular and type-2-diabetes patients she was working with after graduating with her master’s in nutrition and food studies from NYU. After three months of ingesting industrial amounts of fiber, her diabetes patients found that in addition to lowering their blood sugar, they’d lost considerable weight. Soon, non-diabetics were clamoring for diet tips, and when celebrities began signing on (Megyn Kelly, Katie Couric), her career took off. I enjoy my new honey-flavored crackers that evening, before visiting a poultry-themed French bistro called Le Coq Rico, where my dining party and I order two whole chickens, a fat slab of foie gras encased in pastry, and a whole roasted guinea fowl. “What’s the matter, are you ill?” asks one of my guests as I take a bite of each of these delicacies and spend the rest of dinner moving their remains around my plate. On the contrary, I’ve never felt better, which is how new dieters, like new members of any sect, tend to feel during the first, heady days of conversion. I experience bizarre surges of energy, and instead of slouching off to the coffee bar for a post-lunch pick-me-up, I begin taking jaunty afternoon power walks. Food writers tend to fall into two broad categories: those who describe the experience of the meal (Liebling, Calvin Trillin) and those who obsessively chronicle the actual tastes that appear on the plate (Craig Claiborne, Richard Olney). I’ve always considered myself a bumbling, very junior member of the former group, but as I drop three pounds the next session and four more two weeks after that, I begin regaling my startled fresser colleagues with flowery descriptions of the sugary snap of fresh garden carrots. “Now, this is what’s called ‘depth of flavor,’ ” I hear myself proclaim one evening at the fine new Village bistro Mimi. The subject of my enthusiasm, I dimly recall, is a helping of plump, hand-rolled gnocchi, which a couple of short weeks ago I would have hoovered up without comment. But after being relentlessly carpet-bombed with Nordic bran, my taste buds react like they’re experiencing the buttery softness of this Italian dumpling for the first time, a sensation which is repeated as we move from the gnocchi, to the pot of coarsely mashed, properly fatty pork rillettes (“Can you taste those porky barnyard notes?”) on to rhubarb-flavored soufflé (“As light as a balloon!”) for dessert. It doesn’t take long, after years of public grumpiness, for this bizarrely optimistic new tone to creep into my work. “You’re getting soft, Platty,” my editor says as he reads the draft of yet another three-star write-up (three stars out of five being “generally ecstatic” on the tortured Platt scale). Often I’ll go long months without writing a three-star review, especially in this era of clamorous little bar-restaurants and overhyped comfort foods. But I’ve written three during the early stages of my dieting binge, extolling the virtues of everything from pork sandwiches to wood-fired pizza pies. Sure, I’ve turned out the usual jaded critic’s observations in between these love letters, but maybe it’s true, as Zuckerbrot has prophesied, that my new, more measured eating habits will rekindle my love affair with food. But as any nutritionist or serial dieter will tell you, if losing weight is relatively easy, your chances of keeping your appetite in check over time are roughly the same as your summiting the ten highest peaks on the planet without the benefit of oxygen. By an optimistic measure, four out of five people fail to maintain weight loss after a year. Besides, if by some miracle you do manage to shed those extra 50 pounds, it takes years for the complex metabolic triggers that control the appetite to adjust to your new, lighter weight — and some experts think that this never happens. Until that time, the body’s keen metabolic sensors are in protective starvation mode, sending pulsating siren calls throughout your svelte new form via the dimly understood parts of the brain that control that complex jumble of cues we call “appetite.” Which is probably why, weeks into my diet — after conveniently forgetting to record anything in my food diary, consuming an entire 20-course tasting dinner at Blue Hill at Stone Barns (“That’s not on the Daddy Diet,” my horrified daughter says, watching Daddy cram chunks of delicious, fresh-baked chocolate-and-cherry bread down his giant maw), and enjoying a furtive late-night snack of leftover Bonchon fried-chicken wings — the Omron Body Fat Analyzer records that I’ve gained back two pounds of fat. This news happens to coincide with the release of a dispiriting, and widely reported study by researchers a the National Institute of Health who spent years following doomed members of NBC’s Biggest Loser as they relentlessly gained back the hundreds of pounds they’d lost on the show. Predictably, Tanya doesn’t have much time for the Biggest Loser phenomenon (“You can’t expect those poor people to exercise like lunatics for eight hours a day when they get home, Adam!”). We discuss the difference between “hunger,” which is a physiological state (your stomach grumbles, you feel irritable and light-headed, etc.), and “appetite,” which is a murky, psychological one, susceptible to all kinds of imaginary and inherited cues, especially in the funhouse world of restaurants where things like plate size (larger ones make you eat more) and menu descriptions (“succulent,” “fresh baked”) are all carefully manipulated to seduce diners into downing calories like hogs at a trough. “If you don’t want to become another statistic, you can’t eat your restaurant dinners like a normal fat American,” Zuckerbrot says, furrowing her carefully penciled brow in a gently disapproving way. “Mindful indulgence” is this week’s mantra, and for good measure she relates motivational stories about fleshy business-mogul clients who fork over thousands of dollars for her nutritional secrets but in the end never lose a single pound. “Character flows through people like a river,” she says, fixing me with one of her mesmerizing stares. “You know what they say, Adam: If you cheat on your taxes, you’ll cheat in life.” I try not to cheat that week, or the week after, but lumbering slowly around town on my gastronomic rounds, furtively ingesting fiber-cracker snacks in the backs of taxicabs, the magic goal of 20 percent body fat seems like an increasingly distant, Sisyphean task. But as the visits tick by, the Omron Body Fat numbers begin slowly to creep downward, from 28.3 percent (“Anything more than three bites is not mindful indulgence for a man like you!”) to 26.4 percent (“We’re counting carbs, not calories, Adam. Remember, there’s 40 grams of carbs in that cup of quinoa, so when you order one of those bowls, it’s like eating three slices of Wonder Bread!”) to a promising but still very obese 26 percent. The week before my last official visit to the F-Factor offices, I attend two weddings. I write another glowing, three-star review, this time of a new Chinese restaurant in the Village where, among other things, I enjoy two kinds of cold Sichuan-style chicken, several excellent varieties of regional noodle specialties, and an ethereal bowl of rice and tomato soup crowned with strands of fresh watercress. Zuckerbrot has recently gotten engaged, so strips of celebratory pink and white paper bunting are strung up around the white-toned office. When I clamber on the scale, I weigh in at 235 pounds, which is approximately 40 pounds less than when I’d begun my diet experiment. And despite those wedding indulgences, my body fat is also down again, although only by a meager tenth of one percent. Despite the festive decorations, Zuckerbrot’s not in much of a celebratory mood, although, for some reason, I am. When I tell her it’s time to take the training wheels off and chart my own, wobbly dietary course, at least for a while, she regales me with more horror stories about clients who’ve lost over 100 pounds, failed to follow the F-Factor maintenance program (which carries a price tag of $6,000), and returned a year later fatter than ever. She reminds me that I’m still technically obese (“You have 15 pounds to go, Adam; you can’t enjoy yourself yet!”) and that I’ll need “wiggle room” to gain a few pounds, given my hazardous occupation. She cautions me against feeling pleased with myself, because when fat people feel self-satisfied, they tend to reward themselves with buckets of fried chicken. I assure her that those days are over. It’s my plan to lose even more weight over the next couple of weeks, in preparation for my triumphant checkup with Dr. P. I dutifully ingest my crackers that afternoon, and later that evening, at a new French restaurant downtown, I order a congratulatory martini, followed by the relatively slimming fillet of sole, which I enjoy along with a few chaste little tastes of crackly skinned duck breast and several fatty bites of a delicious $43 lamb chop. There are also a few sips of Vouvray (’09 Le Clos de la Meslerie, for the record), followed by a grand flotilla of French desserts — crystal saucers filled with apricots and sorbet, a classic opera cake flecked with gold leaf on top. I take a bite of the little cake, then put down my spoon for a while, but when coffee comes, I take another bite, and then another, and before I know it, the dessert is gone. *A version of this article appears in the September 5, 2016, issue of New York Magazine. Download a PDF of the original article here.
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